How To Be Black

Baratunde Thurston is the CEO, co-founder, and hashtagger-in-chief of Cultivated Wit. He wrote the New York Times bestseller How To Be Black and served for five years as director of digital for the satirical news outlet, The Onion. He writes the monthly back page column for Fast Company and contributes to the MIT Media Lab as a director’s fellow.He lives in Brooklyn, NY.

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Comedian Baratunde Thurston - 'Perception and Comedy' from Open Society Foundations and American Values Institute on FORA.tv

Today I performed at the Black Male Re-Imagined II event in NYC. Other speakers included Trayvon Martin’s mother Sybrina Fulton, Global Grind’s Michael Skolnick, former Republican National Committee Chair Michael Steele, hip hop artist and activist Jasiri X and many more.

You can see lots of vides on the Fora.TV website

Do people consider you an “exception” to your race as in “you’re different?”

February 16 - Do people consider you an “exception” to your race as in “you’re different?”

Throughout Black History Month (and beyond), we’ll be focusing on questions of identity. For day sixteen we want to know: Do people consider you an “exception” to your race as in “you’re different?”

Submit your story (videos are encouraged!)

Here’s how:

  • Pick a question to answer from this list or make your own
  • Click here or the “Submit” button on the top of the page
  • Choose how you’d like to submit. We appreciate video submissions (upload to Vimeo/Youtube then embed) but you can submit in other formats.
  • Indicate the question you’re answering in the title or post section! This will help us a ton when organizing the submissions.

He made an example. He pointed to a kid across the way and said, ‘That kid’s an Oreo.’ And I didn’t know the kid’s name at the time — I saw this nerdy black kid with glasses hanging out with white friends … And that was the first introduction of this concept, inauthentic blackness because you’re comfortable around whiteness.

Baratunde Thurston on the term ‘oreo’ (via nprfreshair). So exciting!!!

(via nprfreshair)

February 1 - When Did You First Realize You Were Black?

Throughout Black History Month (and beyond), we’ll be focusing on questions of identity. For day one, we’re asking a question also asked in How To Be Black: when did you first realize you were black? And if you’re not black, we’re still interested! When did you first realize you were [insert here]?

Submit your story (especially in video), and check out what The Black Panel said in the book.

Here’s how:

  • Pick a question to answer from this list or make your own
  • Click here or the “Submit” button on the top of the page
  • Choose how you’d like to submit. We appreciate video submissions (upload to Vimeo/Youtube then embed) but you can submit in other formats.
  • Indicate the question you’re answering in the title or post section! This will help us a ton when organizing the submissions.

When Did You First Realize You Were Black? #BlackHistoryMonth Day 1

Throughout Black History Month (and beyond), we’ll be focusing on questions of identity. For day one, we’re asking a question also asked in How To Be Black: when did you first realize you were black? And if you’re not black, we’re still interested! When did you first realize you were [insert here]?

Submit your story (especially in video), and check out what The Black Panel said in the book.

Submit your story.